TMTW #393 Will Renting Your Home Destroy Your $250,000 Exclusion?

Tax and Money Tip of the Week:
Will Renting Your Home Destroy Your $250,000 Exclusion?
July 25, 2018 | No. 393

Will Renting Your Home Destroy Your $250,000 Exclusion?

The days when you could convert your rental property or vacation home to a principal residence and then use the full $250,000/$500,000 home-sale exclusion to avoid taxes are gone.

Here’s how the $250,000/$500,000 exclusion works today. You must divide your period of home ownership into two categories—qualified and nonqualified use:

  • Qualified use means the time you or your spouse uses the home as your principal residence.

 

  • Nonqualified use means any time on January 1, 2009, or later in which neither you nor your spouse (or your former spouse) uses the property as a primary residence.

You allocate gain on the sale of your home between the periods of qualified and nonqualified use, and the gain allocated to nonqualified use doesn’t qualify for the $250,000/$500,000 home-sale exclusion.

You have one important exception to the nonqualified use definition: nonqualified use does not include rental use during the five-year period that’s after the last date you or your spouse used the property as your principal residence.

In other words, if you live in your principal residence for two years or more and then rent it out for three years or less, the rental period is not a “period of nonqualified use,” and you qualify for the $250,000/$500,000 home-sale exclusion.

You can add comments on the blog, call 919-847-2981, or visit our web site. We look forward to hearing from you.Questions or Comments?

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